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Had it not been for the Rothschild, India wouldn’t be so poor today. How?

We were plundered, that’s how!
Mumbai-based Rothschild bankers recently gave my friend a very hard time in one of the financial transactions. These centuries-old giants are into government and corporate finance, including private equity fund raisings and exits, privatisations, debt and equity financing, restructurings, and project finance. I will keep the issue classified for now, but the name triggered curiosity. These guys are supposedly not the same anymore… But don’t be fooled.

Halton House, a Rothschild family mansion in Buckinghamshire, England
Halton House, a Rothschild family mansion in Buckinghamshire, England

We may not talk about them as often as we do about the modern richmen, but the Rothschild Empire still lurks in misleading forms and shapes. Forbes has no place for the giants in its list of 500 for obvious reasons, but effectively, even the combined wealth of all doesn’t match up to Rothschild’s prosperity. Fur traders Forbes were Rothschild’s agents in Boston way back in time. Highlighting the wealth in their revered publication could lead to the exposure of past ghosts.

They are not as upfront as they used to be in the 1800s, but they reportedly, clandestinely control world forces. They appear to have adapted well to the new world order, an order where checks and balances are stricter than they were in the yesteryear. We’ll talk about this in the next piece.
For now, a brief about The Rothschild’s past debauchery in India.
The singular cause for India living in the grim shadows of the developed nations, when once she was herself a fully developed region for over 4,000 years, is the East India Company. We all know that. What we might not know, though, is that the British company was then owned and controlled by The Rothschild. India could enjoy its riches only till about the 1600. From then on, the Rothschilds feasted on us.
After it was granted charter to trade with India, the East India Company began sending band of sea pirates, masquerading as merchants with a mission to plunder India, made possible because of our resistance-free culture.

East India Company ships along the Hoogly River in Bengal

After merging with the British Empire, and conquering Bengal, the Rothschild family set up a notoriously crooked structure of administration, aimed at pillaging the immeasurable riches of Bengal, the wealthiest province in the world at the time. They turned Bengal into a necropolis. The bubonic plague took away most of the poor at a time when the Rothschild family was busy stealing from India under the British protection and mandate.
They transferred this wealth to London, which helped the marauders set up the privately-owned Bank of England. In the following decades, the Rothschild banking family set up the Federal Reserve Bank of America, which to this day, indulges in daylight robbery of the American people. They even set up the World Bank and the IMF. Citibank, Standard Chartered bank, etc., were also set up with the secret support of the Rothschild’s to continue the raid of the third world and the Indian people.

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When we revolted in 1857, we were told that the East India Company was abolished and India will be administered directly by the Crown. What we didn’t know, and still might not, is that Crown didn’t imply King or Queen of Britain, but a secretly and privately-owned Corporation of London, headed again by the Rothschilds.
He was so bloody rich already! When the British murdered Tipu Sultan in 1799, the opportunistic Rothschild stole all his gold from Calicut’s temples, worth $7,000 billion!
The robbery of India is being carried on. Nearly 800 million Indians are somehow surviving at under Rs 50 a day, while our millionaire politicians serve some or the other interest of the moneyed.

About the author

Rubi

Whether it’s women issues, politics or the paranormal, Rubi has an opinion on everything. Art and entertainment interest her, too. Hindu College alumni, she has written for The Hindustan Times and The Financial Express. Every now and then, she loves picking up her camera to capture life and its various shades.

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