Was Robert Oppenheimer, the father of atomic bomb, inspired by the Brahmastra?

Posted on by Rubi
 
  

“A single projectile charged with all the power in the Universe…
An incandescent column of smoke and flame as bright as 10,000 suns, rose in all its splendor…
It was an unknown weapon, an iron thunderbolt, a gigantic messenger of death which reduced to ashes an entire race.

The corpses were so burned as to be unrecognizable. Their hair and nails fell out, pottery broke without any apparent cause, and the birds turned white.

After a few hours, all foodstuffs were infected. To escape from this fire, the soldiers threw themselves into the river.”

-The Mahabharata

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Lord Krishna implores Prince Arjuna to fight the Kauravas

Hiroshima and Nagasaki changed the way humans perceived warfare. The 1943 bombings wiped 2 lakh people in Japan, and created unspeakable horrors in the mind of the world. Many Indians, familiar with the Hindu epics the Mahabharata and the Ramayana, however, found some astounding parallels.

The ancient Hindu literature written thousands of years ago, mentions similar warfare that destructs cities in an instant, and when human flesh melts like wax. The similarity to the modern tragedy is so striking that it can’t be dismissed as mere fantasy of a prolific writer.

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These ancient people, who must have walked around the earth thousands of years ago, lay on the streets, without getting decayed by natural elements.

The excavated sites in Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro have presented compelling evidence that those cities were doomed by some ancient nuclear war. Scientists in these sites found skeletons scattered about the city streets, many holding hands and as if struck by some instant catastrophe.

These ancient people, who must have walked around the earth thousands of  years ago, lay on the streets, without getting decayed by natural elements or getting eaten by wild animals.

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Some of the skeletons found in Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro had similar radioactive radiation that was found in the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

That’s not all. So many of these skeletal finds were radioactive, and that’s the most intriguing part. Some of these even had similar radioactive radiation that was found in the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. With no volcanic belt running along the Mohenjo-Daro region, the phenomenon is inexplicable as to what led to the melting of clay vessels, and the fusion of bricked walls. Scientists believe such destruction can only be inflicted by an atomic blast.

Interestingly, J. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of atomic bomb, believed that ancient Indians had used nuclear weapons. The scientist, who was familiar with Sanksrit, and an avid reader of the Gita and referred to the Indian scripture on more than one occasion.

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J. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of atomic bomb, believed that ancient Indians had used nuclear weapons.

Oppenheimer even once hinted at the possibility of nuclear weapons that must have existed during the times of The Ramayana and The Mahabharata. While Oppenheimer was delivering a lecture at Rochester University, during the question and answer session, a student asked: “Was the bomb exploded at Alamogordo during the Manhattan Project the first one to be detonated?

The scientist replied: “Well — yes. In modern times, of course.”

Oppenheimer was referring to the “Brahmastra”, or the multi-headed deadly weapon mentioned in the Mahabharata.

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Oppenheimer (right) even once hinted at the possibility of nuclear weapons that must have existed during the times of The Ramayana and The Mahabharata.

In an interview conducted after he watched the first atomic test, Oppenheimer quoted from the Bhagavad Gita: “‘Now I am become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds.’ I suppose we all felt that way.”

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About the Author

Whether it’s women issues, politics or the paranormal, Rubi has an opinion on everything. Art and entertainment interest her, too. Hindu College alumni, she has written for The Hindustan Times and The Financial Express. Every now and then, she loves picking up her camera to capture life and its various shades.