Pulse of a nation: The 1 rupee-candy that beat cola giant Coke moneywise

Posted on by Rubi
 
  

Pulse candy has reached a cult status. Children, youngsters, and smokers; all are so keen on this hard boiled candy. Kids bully parents to buy them not less than a dozen, youngsters binge on it during lunch hours, and smokers, who till recently would chew a cardamom after a smoke, now prefer sucking on this candy.

Pulse-hand

Pulse candy has reached a cult status. Children, youngsters, and smokers; all are so keen on this hard boiled candy

Pulse, the one-rupee candy has fetched its producers, the DS group, a whooping 100 crore in revenues within 8 months of its launch. And my eyes popped out on what I learned next: the 100-crore mark has beaten the record of another addictive food item, Coke Zero!

That’s a huge feat in itself, beating an age-old iconic product that is globally popular. While Coke spends crores of rupees in branding and marketing its product, not to mention the roping in of popular Bollywood stars, a nondescript candy surpassed them, moneywise. I mean, aren’t business dreams are made of such stuff?

pulse-fake

Six months into the business, and the company was already riding high on profits, earning Rs 50 crore as revenue in October last year. Now the fake candies are trying their luck in the market

Noida-based DS Group is the maker of Baba chewing tobacco, Pass Pass mouth freshener and Rajnigandha paan masala. Pulse was launched as a test drive under Pass Pass in just three states—Rajasthan, Gujarat and Delhi. Interestingly, Pass Pass brings in only 3% of the company’s annual revenue. And now look at what their tiny pillow-packeted sweet treat has yielded…

The success of Pulse is what should fire the young entrepreneurs’ imagination. DS Group spent a considerable amount of time in conceptualizing Pulse. An internal team dedicated for product development worked for almost two years on it.

mago-alpen

The classics Mango Bite, Alpenliebe and Eclairs are very run of the mill. Pulse, on the other hand, brings in that perfect blend of sweetness, sour and salty taste that doesn’t leave your mouth easily

Why the candy has displaced all in its category is because it has an indigenous flavour, the taste of raw mango that the entire country swears by. The classics Mango Bite, Alpenliebe and Eclairs are very run of the mill. Pulse, on the other hand, brings in that perfect blend of sweetness, sour and salty taste that doesn’t leave your mouth easily. I was an ardent fan of Parle’s Kaccha Aam, but it’s the rock salt inside Pulse that swayed my preference.

Six months into the business, and the company was already riding high on profits, earning Rs 50 crore as revenue in October last year. Also, the demand for Pulse grew so big in these 6 months that most paan shops started selling it on extra 50 paise apiece.

And this the company had achieved without spending a single rupee on advertisements. There were no promotions for the brand and it was launched without any frills. I guess what has made Pulse so popular is the company’s strong distribution network, apart from the word-of-mouth publicity by ardent candy-lovers.

pulse-maa

Twitteratti’s are already demanding that Pulse be made a “national candy”, because it brings in people together under one taste

One of my friend (she has never eaten Pulse) pointed out that the candy owes it popularity to paanwallahs, who hand you a Pulse instead of one-rupee coin. She also said that the company that makes tobacco products, could easily include some addictive additive. But I begged to differ.

Twitteratti’s are already demanding that Pulse be made a “national candy”, because it brings in people together under one taste. I would love to add that Skill India, Digital India, and the ilk can just step aside, for a 1 rupee-miracle candy has already minted crores.

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About the Author

Whether it’s women issues, politics or the paranormal, Rubi has an opinion on everything. Art and entertainment interest her, too. Hindu College alumni, she has written for The Hindustan Times and The Financial Express. Every now and then, she loves picking up her camera to capture life and its various shades.